03 Aug 2010

See me on tv!

Information No Comments

I made a small appearance on the episode of Australian Story that aired on the ABC on the 27th of July. The story was about my brother and his efforts to improve patient safety (at some personal cost).

I am interviewed so if you haven’t met me you can check me out (including a couple of embarrassing childhood photos) on

www.abc.net.au/austory

You can watch previous complete previous episodes on line. The episode is called “Doctor in the house”.

03 Aug 2010

Healthy eating before, during and after pregnancy.

Information No Comments

Nutrition is essential to maintain healthy body function, and now more than ever, nutrition is essential to assist your growing baby. Stock your home with healthy fresh foods, remember, what is stored in your pantry is what your family and future children will eat.

From as early as a few months old, your baby will be watching what you consume!

Read more

03 Aug 2010

Diabetes In pregnancy – Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM)

Information No Comments

Approximately 5% of pregnant women will develop Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) during their pregnancy. Left untreated, GDM may cause problems during the pregnancy, or for the baby. The diabetes usually goes away once the baby is born. Read more

03 Aug 2010

Coming out through the sunroof – Caesarean childbirth

Information No Comments

For those women planning on having a caesarean, the prospect of delivering your baby in the unfamiliar setting of an operating theatre can seem quite daunting.

Therefore it’s important to have some understanding of what goes on before, during and after a caesarean.  This also applies to women counting on a vaginal delivery, because although I aim to satisfy your wishes with regard to birth options, sometimes certain unforeseeable circumstances (such as fetal distress during labour) mean that the safest option is to head to the operating theatre for an unexpected caesarean. Read more

03 Aug 2010

Birth plans

Information No Comments

Many couples are happy to plan labour with a “wait and see how it goes” approach while others prefer to write a more formal birth plan. There is no right and wrong about this, it is simply a matter of personal preference.

I think birth plans – while far from compulsory – are quite a good idea for a couple of reasons: Read more

03 Aug 2010

Goodbye, medicare safety net

Information No Comments

News reports out today (including on the front page of the Sydney Morning Herald) seem to confirm what many of us have expected for some time – that obstetric services will be removed from the Medicare Safety net in next tueday’s budget.

It would have been political suicide for the Federal Government to renege on their election promise to maintain the safety net and there is growing resistance out there to the current trend of means testing pretty much everything. Read more

03 Aug 2010

Private obstetricians – not so evil after all!

Information No Comments

I don’t exactly run to the mailbox when the Medical Journal of Australia arrives early each month and so it was today. Anyway while thumbing through today’s edition I came across an article and an accompanying editorial examining outcomes for women and babies in Australia.

Of course you will have noticed many articles in the press recently decrying the bad habits of private obstetricians – most particularly our high obstetric intervention rates. The Sydney Morning Heraldin particular seems only too happy to devote front page real estate to any story illustrating the evils of caesareans and obstetricians (and of course the two go together) notwithstanding the more than occasional flimsiness of the science involved. Read more

03 Aug 2010

Homebirth…again

Information No Comments

Well its 5 45 am on Good Friday and I can’t sleep. The reason is I’ve just attended a wonderful birth. One of my patients began her first labour at about 2 this morning and then had a perfectly natural birth at about 5 am.

No complications, no stitches, all perfectly natural with the father virtually doing the delivery himself. (I have told her that many women will be very envious of her experience).

Read more

03 Aug 2010

Your baby’s movements

Information No Comments

From around 20 weeks of pregnancy you will begin to feel your baby moving inside you. Some women begin to feel movements a week or so earlier than 20 weeks and some a week or so later.

The time at which you begin to feel movements depends upon whether you have previously had a baby and the location of your placenta (afterbirth). Your baby’s movements are important because they are a significant sign of your baby’s wellbeing – indeed a more important sign than, say, a strong sounding heart beat. Babies are like children and adults – if they are sick they are less active. Tragically every year we see one or two women whose baby has become unwell inside them and the baby has died. Often such stillbirths are sudden and unpreventable but sometimes a baby can begin to slow down a day or more prior to dying – thus a theoretical opportunity might exist to save such a baby by delivering it urgently if it is mature enough to survive outside the womb. Read more

03 Aug 2010

Medical matters relating to twin pregnancies

Information No Comments

Types of twins
There are two types of twins – identical and non-identical. There are two membranes surrounding all babies when they are inside the womb

– the outer membrane, which is continuous with the placenta, is called the chorion and the inner membrane is the amnion. In most pregnancies the two are so close together they are indistinguishable from each other. Read more